Warble Entertainment's

Ian the Historical Musician

Ian the Historical Musician
Location Birmingham
Starting from £204.00

Ian is a multi-instrumentalist specialising in the music of the renaissance and mediaeval periods, playing period instruments such as the beautiful lute, the early renaissance guitar and the silvery sound of the cittern.

Add that extra-special touch with authentic historical music played by “a mature talent well in command of the material” (Folk Monthly), especially if your wedding is to take place in a historical building.

Ian is flexible to suit the needs of your event: he can play music for some or all of the bride’s entrance; signing of the register; wedding breakfast; guest entertainment; and he can play in renaissance or modern clothes.

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Gallery
Song List

Lute

  • Thomas Morley, 1599 – O mistress mine
  • John Dowland, c. 1620 – Mr. Dowland’s Midnight
  • John Dowland, c. 1615 – Fortune
  • John Dowland, c. 1590 – Tarlton’s Resurrection
  • John Dowland, c. 1590 – Mrs. Winter’s Jump
  • John Dowland, c. 1590 – Robin is to the green wood gone
  • Robert Johnson, 1610 – Where the bee sucks
  • Cesare Negri, 1602 – Il Bianco Fiore
  • Francis Cutting, c. 1595 – Francis Cutting’s Toy
  • Francis Cutting, c. 1595 – The Squirrel’s Toy
  • Francesco Canova da Milano, 1536 – Fantasia 7
  • Christopher Marlowe, c. 1590 – Come live with me and be my love
  • John Sturt, 1620 – The Lady Banning, her Almand
  • Thomas Robinson, c.1600 – Robinsons May
  • Ian Pittaway, 2001 – Lady Poplar’s Gift
  • Ian Pittaway, 2004 – The Twin Binding Fancy
  • Ian Pittaway, 2006 – Fantasia Margherita Maria
  • anon., England, 1610 – Gray’s Inn mask
  • anon., England, 1600 – Prince’s Mask
  • anon., England, 1616 – Draw near me and love me
  • anon., England, 1590 – Folger Dowland f.87r
  • trad. England, c. 1601 – When that I was
  • trad., England, c. 1620 – Home again, Market is done
  • trad., England, c. 1560 – Heart’s ease
  • trad., England, 1584 – Calen o Custure me
  • trad., England, 1580 – Greensleeves
  • trad., England, c. 1600 – How should I your true love know
  • trad., England, 1583 – Rogero  
  • trad., England, 1590 – Kemps jigge
  • anon., Scotland, c. 1605-20 – Rowallan untitled
  • anon., Scotland, c. 1605-20 – Gypsies Lilt 
  • anon., Scotland, c. 1627 – The Canaries
  • anon., Scotland, 1620 – Mure of Rowallan, f.5
  • trad., France, 1589  – Belle qui tiens ma vie
  • trad., France, 1603 – Branle et Branle gay
  • anon. Italy, c. 1502-1512 – Calata

Renaissance Guitar

  • Anthony Holborne, 1599 – The Night Watch
  • trad., England, 1620 and Germany, 1612 – La Volta
  • trad., England, 1651 – Broom : The bonny bonny Broom
  • trad., England, 1651 – Chestnut (or Dove’s Figary)
  • trad., England, 1651 – Jenny Pluck Pears
  • trad., France, 1589 – Pinagay
  • trad., France, 1589 – Branle des lavandieres
  • trad., France, 1589 – Branle d’Escosse

Cittern

  • trad., England, 1590 – Sellenger’s Round
  • trad., England, 1651 – Millison’s Jig
  • trad., England, 1590 – All in a Garden Green
  • trad., England, 1590 – Gathering Peascods
  • trad., England, 1587 – Go From My Window
  • trad., England, 1618 – The little Barly-Corne
  • trad., England, 1637 – Cuckolds all a row
  • trad., England, c. 1610 – Goddesses 
  • trad., France, 1589 – Branle Cassandre
  • trad., France, 1589 – Branle des Hermites
  • trad., France, 1589 – Branle des chevaulx
  • trad., France, 1589 – Branle de l'official  
  • trad., Scotland, c. 1650 – Sweet smiling Katie loves me
  • Thomas D'Urfey, 1706 – In the Fields in Frost and Snow